Project Type Parks & Trails
Project Status Construction
Project Area Esquimalt; Langford; Victoria; View Royal
Estimated Cost $36,000,000

Description

Our Newest Regional Traile-and-n-program-id-web

This cycling and pedestrian trail is being constructed largely within the E&N rail corridor. The E&N Rail Trail-Humpback Connector is being built in phases over a number of years and will be 17 kilometres in length when complete. This newest addition to the regional trail system provides an important non-motorized transportation and recreation link between Victoria and the Western communities. To date, approximately 10km of the trail is open for public use.

Open House

Drop in to see the proposed design for the next phase of E&N Rail Trail construction, planned from Atkins Avenue to Savory Elementary School, in Langford. Talk with staff about the project and overall progress on this 17-km pedestrian and cycling trail.

Wednesday, August 15, 3:30 - 6:30pm
Westshore Parks and Recreation Centre
Building 5 (Field House), Lower Level (across from Q Centre Arena)
1767 Island Highway, Colwood

Trail Sections Open To Public Use

Although construction of the entire trail is not complete, three sections are open to public use. Where gaps exist, local roads or sidewalks connect users to the next section of trail.

  • Jacklin Road to Savory School
  • Atkins Avenue to Hallowell Road
  • Maplebank Road to Esquimalt Road
  • Trail Map

Trail Construction 2018

Maplebank Road to Hallowell Road (1 km)

This section of trail will be completed in the Fall 2018. At present, the segment between Maplebank Road and the Admirals Road/Hallowell Road intersection is complete and the Hallowell Road segment is under construction. Please be caution in the vicinity of the current construction site. This part of the trail is expected to be complete later in the Fall 2018. The CRD is working with the Island Corridor Foundation, the Town of View Royal, Esquimalt and Songhees Nations, and the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure on this 1 km section of trail

Atkins Avenue to Savory School (1 km)

This section of trail will fill another gap between the railway crossing on Atkins Avenue and Savory School in Langford. Though short in distance, this section of the E&N Rail Trail is a particularly complex one, with the Millstream Creek valley and the railway structure posing design and construction challenges. The CRD will host an open house to highlight the design for Phase 3 – Atkins Avenue to Savory Elementary School, in Langford. The date, location, and time for the open house will be provided on this site once it has been confirmed.

Future Construction

Esquimalt Road to the Johnson Street bridge

This section of trail will link Esquimalt Road and the Johnson Street bridge, in the City of Victoria. It will be constructed in part by CRD, the City of Victoria, and by area developers, as part of their development approval requirements from the City of Victoria.

Jacklin Road to Humpback Road

The final segment of trail required to complete the E&N Rail Trail is a 3.6 km section of trail from Jacklin Road to Humpback Road in the City of Langford. The Regional Trails Management Plan (2016) recommends a trail be developed along Humpback Road to link the E&N Rail Trail to Sooke Hills Wilderness Regional Park in the City of Langford.

Frequently Asked Questions

When will the trail be completed?

Trail construction began in 2009 and will take many years to complete. The trail is being constructed in a number of phases and construction will continue until the project is complete, subject to staff and funding availability. 10 kilometres of the 17-kilometre route are complete.

Who is involved in building the trail?

CRD Regional Parks and CRD Environmental Engineering are working with municipal and First Nation partners in Victoria, Esquimalt, View Royal, Langford, Songhees Nation, Esquimalt Nation, and with the Province of BC and Island Corridor Foundation/Southern Rail of Vancouver Island.

How much will it cost?

The overall project value is estimated at $36 million. To-date, about $18 million has been invested in this project.

Where is the money coming from?

The overall trail project has been strongly supported by the federal government through the Regionally Significant Projects, Strategic Priorities Gas Tax funding ($14 million), and the Western Economic Diversification Fund ($1 million), and by the Province of BC through Bike BC ($2.7 million) and Local Motion funding ($275,000). The CRD has covered all costs that are not encompassed by grant funding ($2.2 million).

What is the rationale for the order in which the trail is being built?

Due to the significant cost of building the entire trail at one time, a phased approach to trail development was approved by the CRD Board in 2009. Phase 1 was broken into seven project areas, with a portion of the trail in each of the partner municipalities. Phases 2 and 3 link the trail together. Future phases extend the trail on either end.

Why is it taking so long to build?

The rail trail project is a complex construction project involving the CRD, four municipalities, two First Nations, the rail corridor landowner, the railway operator, and in some cases, utility companies and developers. There are requirements relating to construction, railway operation, underground utilities, and municipal bylaws that must be addressed with each section. As with most construction projects, it takes time to work through the various requirements and processes. For example, the Galloping Goose Regional Trail took approximately ten years to complete.

Will the Rail Trail connect to current trails such as the Galloping Goose?

Yes. The E&N Rail Trail is co-located with the Galloping Goose Regional Trail for approximately 2 km near the Atkins Avenue parking lot and rest stop. Once the trail is completed a loop route will exist between the Johnson Street Bridge and Burnside Rd West/Island Highway using the Goose and the E&N trails. Future municipal and regional trail systems may also connect with the E&N Rail Trail over time.

Why is there a fence between the trail and rail when there is no train running?

This railway is still officially active, and from time to time, it is used by Island Corridor Foundation or Southern Rail of Vancouver Island for operational purposes. In developing the E&N Rail Trail, the CRD must comply with federal safety requirements. Along the trail this includes a safety fence, located between the rail line and the trail.

Why are railway crossing upgrades required when there is no train running?

The safety improvements at the rail crossing are required to meet Transport Canada’s Canadian Railway-Roadway Grade Crossings Standards. It includes specific intersection safety upgrades (barriers, signals and pedestrian crossings) which must be put in as part of the trail construction process.

Images

Whats New

Last updated August 11

  • Added Open House information under Description

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Additional Information

Video

Experience the E&N Rail Trail in this Shaw TV video which shows which sections are open, what's under construction and future sections to developed.

Partners

  • Esquimalt Nation
  • Songhees Nation
  • Federal Government
  • Province of BC
  • Municipalities of Victoria, Esquimalt, View Royal, Langford
  • Island Corridor Foundation

Contact Us

Carolyn Stewart
Park and Trails Planner 
490 Atkins Avenue
Victoria, BC V9B 2Z8
Tel: 250.360.3368
Email